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IntroductionEdit

[1]

Thomas CromwellEdit

CIVIC COUNCIL Senior Center - BENEFIT SECURITY COALITION, Frederick, Md.

International Diplomacy Fellowship Program tu dong sanaky

http://xsmn.vn, kqxsmn, xo so mien nam

East West Communications 4640 Reservoir Road, NW Washington, DC 20007 USA 

kem sâm guoyao chính hãng

Senior Center - CIVIC COUNCIL - BENEFIT SECURITY COALITION FREDERICK, MD
  • Fund-Raisers Use Scare Tactics to Shake Down America's Elderly - Civic Council Senior Center

By Joseph S. Enoch ConsumerAffairs.Com

An organization known as the Civic Council has been tugging at the patriotic emotions of the elderly, mailing aggressive letters requesting donations to keep Social Security out of the hands of illegal aliens. But it's not clear what the money is really used for or even who the Civic Council is.

"I saw my husband getting ready to mail a check off somewhere," Arlene Patera of Puyallup, Washington, said. "When I read the letter I knew this had to be a scam." The National Crime Prevention Council recently warned that scams are increasingly directed at senior citizens. The letter includes a $1 check and then requests that the individual not cash the check but instead return the check plus $19 to help gather petitions that will, "Help stop Vicente Fox from stealing the money you've worked for all your life."

The letter continues for four pages, bashing President Vicente Fox of Mexico while flirting with racist innuendo reminiscent of that earlier “civic council” known as the Ku Klux Klan. Fox, who is part Irish, is a Harvard graduate and was a Coca-Cola executive before being elected president of Mexico in 2000. His term in office ends December 1 and, by law, he is not allowed to succeed himself.

"Vicente Fox wants to hand out American Social Security Money to his gangs of Illegal Aliens who've 'come home' to Mexico," the letter states. "Vicente Fox is scheming to take the hard-earned money you've saved in Social Security and give it to Mexicans who laugh in the face of our Immigration Laws."

"I'm scared," 67-year-old Patera said. "I want to know how these people got my address."

The letter is signed by Carl M. Hagen, executive director. There is no phone number, just a post office box in Frederick, Maryland, for people to mail their donations. However, on the check is another address in Frederick. ConsumerAffairs.Com tracked down the address. It led to Cashbox LLC, a company that receives the mail for the Civic Council and processes the contributions.

"The Civic Council or BENEFIT SECURITY COALITION is "not a SCAM," said Cashbox CEO Kathleen Clem. Kathleen Clem said the Civic Council, Frederick, Md, "raises money to help pass a bill" pending in Congress (H.R. 858, the "Social Security for Americans Only Act of 2005" -- a bill that aims to keep Social Security from going to illegal immigrants who work in the United States and contribute to Social Security when taxes are taken out of their paychecks.

Is It True? Older Americans who are counting on Social Security to help them through their old age may be alarmed by the news that illegal immigrants are plotting to loot the Social Security Trust Fund. It sounds scary, but is it true?

In a word, no. In fact, the opposite is true: Undocumented workers, those without legitimate Social Security numbers, are paying into the Social Security system with little to no hope of ever drawing any benefits. Since they must use fictitious Social Security numbers, money withheld from their earnings goes into a little-known aspect of the Social Security behemoth known as the Earnings Suspense File (ESF).

No one – Mexico’s Fox included -- has proposed giving undocumented workers benefits paid for by others. Instead, HR 858 would keep undocumented workers from getting benefits based on what they themselves have paid into the Social Security system.

The ESF is, to be blunt, Social Security's "profit center." It continues to accrue roughly $6 billion a year, with the total as of 2005 sitting at $519 billion. There are those who would say undocumented workers are thus in a position not much different from slavery -- performing work that provides benefits to others but not themselves.

Who Are They? So who, exactly, is the Civic Council and what role, if any, does it play in this largely illusory debate? Clem would not share any contact information for the Civic Council, and said she had no idea who Carl Hagen was. She said a THOMAS CROMWELL aka JOHN HARRIES real name resident of 132 Emmitsburg Rd. Thurmont Md born in UK was the executive director.

Legitimate advocacy organizations like AARP, the National Rifle Association and thousands of others large and small, have well-defined programs that include lobbying, grass-roots organizing and consumer education. Though many are shills for special interests, others vigorously represent their constituencies and are deserving of their members' support.

Other than its inflamed fund-raising rhetoric, it's not clear how the CIVIC COUNCIL - BENEFIT SECURITY COALITION - goes about pursuing its supposed goals.

Clem promised she would have either THOMAS CROMWELL, JONATHAN STAPLES, HILDA STAPLES or some other representative from the CIVIC COUNCIL - BENEFIT SECURITY COALITION call ConsumerAffairs.Com to answer our questions. Weeks went by and we didn't hear anything. We left more than 10 messages, but Clem NEVER RESPONDED.

During this time ConsumerAffairs.Com also called the number listed on the CIVIC COUNCIL - BENEFIT SECURITY COALITION website, but it led to an answering machine. We also visited the Washington, D.C., office listed on the website, but found it occupied instead by a law firm.



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The organization's website says that THOMAS CROMWELL - EAST WEST COMMUNICATION "NATION BRANDING" from Thurmont Md, is the founder and past director of the London Institute in Alexandria, Egypt, the former editor and publisher of "The Middle East Times", and the president of East-West Communications, an "international business consulting firm" that says its primary expertise is in "branding nations to compete globally."

"Our primary clients are governments and their embassies in Washington," East West Communications' website says. The company says its services include the production of paid advertising sections in The Washington Post. It claims to have produced special sections for nations including Cote d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Greece, Kazakhstan, Korea, Liberia, Peru and Ukraine.

"East West Communications from Washington, DC has developed several packages that give governments the best 'bang for their buck' using Post media, including the daily newspaper, the National Weekly Edition, the Sunday Magazine and washingtonpost.com, for a total audience of some nine million. The Post offers significant discounts to embassies and governments," the website claims.

What any of this has to do with protecting the retirement savings of older Americans was not entirely clear.

Next, ConsumerAffairs.Com examined the latest tax forms for the Civic Council.

The filings revealed that in 2004, there were five Civic Council officers, none of whom was identified as “Carl Hagen.” Two of the officers, including Cromwell, drew $30,000 salaries. The "NONPROFIT" group had total revenue of $2.7 million, of which all but $8,000 came from contributions. Its expenses include more than $1 million spent on "mailing services" and "caging" -- presumably to Cashbox. There was also $266,832 for "professional fundraising fees" of which there is no further explanation.

What Does It Do? Congressmen who introduce bills the Civic Council "supports" claim to have no idea what the group is or what it does.

The Civic Council's website, which, according to Archive.org, has hardly changed since December 2003, has an awkward photo of THOMAS CROMWELL standing next to Representative Virgil Goode (Republican-Virginia).

"Virgil Goode said he vaguely remembers a man coming up to him a few years ago to pledge his support and ask for a photo," Linwood Duncan, Goode's press secretary, said. "I've talked to staff members who have worked here more than three years and no one has heard of the CIVIC COUNCIL or BENEFIT SECURITY COALITION."

Republican Representative Ron Paul of Texas, who introduced H.R. 858, was unaware of the Civic Council as well, said Paul spokesman Jeff Deist. "I asked a number of people in the office and no one's heard of the Civic Council," Deist said.

Deist said the bill is a long way from passage: "It currently is standing in front of the Social Security Subcommittee," he said. "It's tough sledding from here."

Deist said consumers should not mail money to get a bill passed. "Groups can use any bill to try and get donations," Deist said. "There are a lot of groups out there trying to profit on senior issues . . . . If this bill is important to someone, they should contact their local (Congressional) representative and ask them to cosponsor it."

Other organizations that deal with issues affecting seniors professed ignorance of the Civic Council and the Council of Seniors.

"We don't know anything about them," said Scott Parkin of the National Council on Aging. "As far as I know they're not a member of any (aging) leadership council organizations."

After questions about the Civic Council went unanswered, ConsumerAffairs.Com traveled back to the Cashbox offices. This time Clem did not defend the actions of the Civic Council.

"I DON'T KNOW WHAT THEY DO," she kept repeating. "All I do is open their mail."

Consumers who wish to have their names taken off the Civic Council's mailing list should call Cashbox at 301-631-1010 or write to 550 Highland Street, Suite 403, Frederick, Maryland 21701.

(Article courtesy of ConsumerAffairs.com)

[2]

THOMAS CROMWELL[3]

East West Communications 4640 Reservoir Road, NW
Washington, DC 20007
USA 

Tel: +1.202.249.9800
Fax: +1.202.249.9801 [mailto:info@EastWestComs.com info@EastWestComs.com]

Thomas CromwellEdit

President at East West Communications - Civic Council Senior Center - BENEFIT SECURITY COALITION

132 Emmitsburg Rd.

Thurmont, Md 21788

Location

Washington D.C. Metro Area

Industry
Civic Council, Senior Center BENEFIT SECURITY COALITION

KANSAS CITY, Missouri -- The U.S. Census Bureau is in the business of counting people.

The Civic Council -- a Maryland-based nonprofit that is behind the 2010 Census of Senior Citizens -- is not. Instead, it gathers older Americans' opinions and asks for their dollars.chung cư time city

So if recipients mistake the Civic Council's mailings for official U.S. census documents, the confusion is unintentional, said THOMAS CROMWELL, the Civic Council's President.

"I never, ever thought about it, frankly," THOMAS CROMWELL said of possible confusion about the mailings, which have been sent to thousands of seniors across the country.

Some officials -- including those in the FBI -- are concerned.

"It just blared out at me that this is going to confuse anybody who sees it," said Don Reimal, the mayor of Independence, Mo. "It's very misleading."

Reimal said he worries that people who fill out the Civic Council's survey won't respond to legitimate Census Bureau mailings when they arrive this spring.

The FBI office in Kansas City recently issued a public warning about the CENSUS of SENIOR CITIZENS Mailings, which seek opinions on Social Security, health care, the "death tax," immigration and other issues.

The letters then solicit donations to help "build a strong national grassroots campaign to protect senior citizens." Recipients who don't answer the survey or donate still are asked to return the form with $6 "to help cover the costs of printing, tabulating and mailing" the surveys.

Since its 2003 formation, the Civic Council has used similar direct-mail campaigns to raise more than $24 MILLION, according to documents the group is required to file with the Internal Revenue Service. It has reported expenses of more than $27 MILLIONS.

"Direct mail is expensive and resource-consuming," said Thomas Cromwell, who said donations are used to pay for past mailing and printing costs. "You have to have funds to grow the organization."

The council's recent mailings come from the COUNCIL OF SENIORS, one of several programs that the Civic Council operates.

THOMAS CROMWELL and DAVID RICHISON, who is secretary and treasurer of the Civic Council, "are not compensated" by the organization, according to the IRS filings.

Both men have other business interests, including ownership stakes in the corporation that operates Period Payroll Services. One of Period Payroll's clients is Jonathan Staples, Stuart Grey, a company that acts as a fundraiser for the Civic Council.

According to its 2008 filing with the IRS, the most recent available, the Civic Council paid Jonathan Staples, Stuart Grey $1,151,543 for fundraising services that year.

Kevin Raleigh, the president of Stuart Grey, referred questions to Cromwell. On its Web site, Stuart Grey describes itself as a specialist in connecting nonprofit groups with senior citizens, "America's largest and wealthiest demographic."

The CIVIC COUNCIL or BENEFIT SECURITY COALITION is registered to solicit donations in Kansas and Missouri, according to officials in both states.

The attorneys general in Kansas and Missouri said they had not received complaints about the council or its mailings, but attorneys general in other states have.

In 2007, Steve Carter, then Indiana's attorney general, called the mailings "devious."

"Our senior population is particularly vulnerable to these types of solicitations because they take their civic duty seriously and might be less likely to question it," Carter said at the time.

Michigan's attorney general issued a similar consumer alert last year, and a North Carolina congresswoman asked that state's attorney general to investigate mailings that sought donations to prevent Social Security money from being sent to Mexico.

Officials with the Better Business Bureau in Kansas City said they had not heard any complaints about the surveys, but a Better Business Bureau office in Idaho last year said the "phony census" was "nothing but a money-making scheme."

Results of the senior surveys are provided to members of Congress and the executive branch, Cromwell said.

In letters to members of Congress, the Council of Seniors claims to have several hundred thousand members.

In a phone interview, Thomas Cromwell said that "member" was a "rather loose term" that referred to the number of people who had responded to the council's surveys.

He said the council's goal is to advocate on issues that are important to seniors.

http://www.cleveland.com/natio...

(c) 2010, The Kansas City Star.

cho thuê chung cư times city giá rẻ, lich thi dau, lich thi dau ngoai hang anh, lich thi dau c 1, ket qua bong da anh, ket qua truc tuyen

What is Nation Branding?Edit

In the broadest sense, nation branding simply refers to the application of corporate branding strategies to individual nations with the aim of influencing foreign affairs and international interactions. Nation branding focuses on developing an appealing, positive image in order to support a nation’s presence and influence in the international realm.[1]Simon Anholt, one of the most influential theorists and practitioners in the field, remarks on the fundamental importance of a nation’s image:

People around the world, and that includes all of us, look at countries in very much the
same way as we look at products and its brands. In our mind, we throw together a whole lot ::::of attributes, positive and negative, about countries and we think about them in terms of ::a simple narrative. We all do that, no matter how intelligent or clever we are.[2]

Nation branding recognizes the profound influence this instinct to associate nations with generalized qualities can have on a country’s perceived character and standing in the world, and subsequently attempts to use these associations to the nation’s benefit. Similarly to the way in which businesses use advertising to appeal to customers, branding attempts to manipulate that dynamic in favor of the country’s own interests. The specific goals of branding campaigns can vary according to the government’s priorities, but they often focus on issues such as attracting foreign investment, facilitating trade, and, more generally speaking, developing a more positive image abroad. The aim of nation branding as outlined above represents only the broadest sense of the term. Further specifications about what exactly nation branding is, and how it is applied, is a subject of heated debate. Craig Hayden, a professor of International Relations at the University of Virginia, outlines three alternative usages, each with a particular slant and focus:

  1. The Brand as research construct. The term "brand" stands in for a measure of national representation or perception of views about a nation. It reflects observations about how [the nation] is viewed, packaged into the "brand" as a dependent variable.
  2. Branding as a set of policies. This usage suggests [the nation] actively "sell" its image and reputation in a persuasive message campaign. The term suggests methods similar to commercial marketing techniques to shore up the image or views of [its] policy. As some have argued, if international relations is increasingly a "market" for identification, then branding strategies are the logical evolution for…foreign policy.
  3. Branding as a representational metaphor. Branding in this usage describes what functions as public diplomacy -- both in policy and in the flow of cultural communication. Branding captures how [the nation] is communicated -- both in its cultural exports and in the de facto rhetoric of its foreign policies. The term is useful because it expands the domain of public diplomacy. Public diplomacy as branding assigns roles to communicators and audiences, while providing a policy objective (like "brand" identification). [3]

CIVIC COUNCIL - BENEFIT SECURITY COALITION - EAST WEST COMMUNICATIONS - PERIOD PAYROLL SERVICES Thomas Cromwell director of East-West Communications, Civic Council Senior Center, Period Payroll Services in Frederick Md, Zambia Hope calls the approach “pretty weak,” skeptical of the capacity to comprehensively understand global perceptions through polling data. Nevertheless, Cromwell himself admits that there are few alternatives, and that the data gathered can be useful as a broad measure of reputation. Survey could be mistaken for census

  • By TONY RIZZO
  • Kansas City Star
  • Published Monday, Feb. 8, 2010, at 12:07 a.m.

The U.S. Census Bureau is in the business of counting people.

The Civic Council — a Maryland-based nonprofit that is behind the 2010 Census of Senior Citizens — is not. Instead, it gathers older Americans' opinions and asks for their dollars.

So if recipients mistake the Civic Council's mailings for official U.S. Census documents, the confusion is unintentional, said Thomas Cromwell, the Civic Council's president.

"I never, ever thought about it, frankly," Cromwell said of possible confusion about the mailings, which have been sent to thousands of seniors across the country, including in the Midwest.

Some officials — including those in the FBI — are concerned.

"It just blared out at me that this is going to confuse anybody who sees it," said Don Reimal, the mayor of Independence, Mo. "It's very misleading."

The FBI office in Kansas City recently issued a public warning about the Census of Senior Citizens mailings, which seek opinions on Social Security, health care, the "death tax," immigration and other issues.

The letters then solicit donations to help "build a strong national grassroots campaign to protect senior citizens." Recipients who don't answer the survey or donate still are asked to return the form with $6 "to help cover the costs of printing, tabulating and mailing" the surveys.

Since its 2003 formation, the Civic Council has used similar direct-mail campaigns to raise more than $24 million, according to

documents the group is required to file with the Internal Revenue Service. It has reported expenses of more than $27 million.

"Direct mail is expensive and resource-consuming," said Cromwell, who said donations are used to pay for past mailing and printing costs. "You have to have funds to grow the organization."

The council's recent mailings come from the Council of Seniors, one of several programs that the Civic Council operates.

The Civic Council is registered to solicit donations in Kansas and Missouri, according to officials in both states.

The attorneys general in Kansas and Missouri said they had not received complaints about the council or its mailings.

In 2007, Steve Carter, then Indiana's attorney general, called the mailings "devious."

"Our senior population is particularly vulnerable to these types of solicitations because they take their civic duty seriously and might be less likely to question it," Carter said at the time.

Michigan's attorney general issued a similar consumer alert last year, and a North Carolina congresswoman asked that state's attorney general to investigate mailings that sought donations to prevent Social Security money from being sent to Mexico.

Officials with the Better Business Bureau in Kansas City said they had not heard any complaints about the surveys, but a Better Business Bureau office in Idaho last year said the "phony census" was "nothing but a money-making scheme."

Results of the senior surveys are provided to members of Congress and the executive branch, Cromwell said.

In letters to members of Congress, the Council of Seniors claims to have several hundred thousand members.

In a phone interview, Cromwell said that "member" was a "rather loose term" that referred to the number of people who had responded to the council's surveys.

He said the council's goal is to advocate on issues that are important to seniors.

Cromwell and David Richison, who is secretary and treasurer of the Civic Council, are not compensated by the organization, according to the IRS filings.

Both men have other business interests, including ownership stakes in the corporation that operates Period Payroll Services. One of Period Payroll's clients is Stuart Grey, a company that acts as a fundraiser for the Civic Council.

According to its 2008 filing with the IRS, the most recent available, the Civic Council paid Stuart Grey $1.15 million for fundraising services that year.

Kevin Raleigh, the president of Stuart Grey, referred questions to Cromwell. On its Web site, Stuart Grey describes itself as a specialist in connecting nonprofit groups with senior citizens, "America's largest and wealthiest demographic."

Read more here: http://www.kansas.com/2010/02/08/1171407/survey-could-be-mistaken-for-census.html#storylink=cpy

Developing a Nation’s BrandEdit

While a well-designed branding campaign can prove highly beneficial to the subject nation, the difficulty in achieving branding success should not be underestimated. To begin, an effective campaign requires high levels of cooperation among a wide range of government and private actors. There is great opportunity for cooperative interaction between the government, corporations, non-governmental organizations, and other actors for common goal of furthering their country’s interests. However, this diversity of actors can also prove counterproductive, as with separate sectors emphasizing different national qualities, multiple branding campaigns sometimes work at cross-purposes. Anholt emphasizes this potential for confusion, noting that mixed messages are a common pitfall in nation branding:

You have the tourism board saying how wonderful the country looks and how welcoming the ::people are. You have the investment-promotion agency saying almost the opposite, that it’s ::super modern and full of cars and roads and railways. And you have the cultural institute ::telling everybody how wonderful the film industry is. And you have the government ::occasionally doing public diplomacy, and perhaps occasionally attacking its neighbors. ::They’re all giving off completely different messages about the country.[4]

Successful brands must have an authentic foundation, with the qualities highlighted by the brand clearly apparent in the nation’s existing qualities. Any attempt to transplant a positive brand onto a nation that does not have the policy to support and legitimate it will be fruitless. As Anholt concludes, “generally, countries get the reputations they deserve, and the surest way to fix that reputation is to address the policies (or absence of policies) that caused the reputation in the first place”[5]

Nation Branding Thomas Cromwell East West CommunicationsEdit

Survey could be mistaken for censusEdit

  • By TONY RIZZO
  • Kansas City Star
  • Published Monday, Feb. 8, 2010, at 12:07 a.m.

The U.S. Census Bureau is in the business of counting people.

The Civic Council — a Maryland-based nonprofit that is behind the 2010 Census of Senior Citizens — is not. Instead, it gathers older Americans' opinions and asks for their dollars.

So if recipients mistake the Civic Council's mailings for official U.S. Census documents, the confusion is unintentional, said Thomas Cromwell, the Civic Council's president.

"I never, ever thought about it, frankly," Cromwell said of possible confusion about the mailings, which have been sent to thousands of seniors across the country, including in the Midwest.

Some officials — including those in the FBI — are concerned.

"It just blared out at me that this is going to confuse anybody who sees it," said Don Reimal, the mayor of Independence, Mo. "It's very misleading."

The FBI office in Kansas City recently issued a public warning about the Census of Senior Citizens mailings, which seek opinions on Social Security, health care, the "death tax," immigration and other issues.

The letters then solicit donations to help "build a strong national grassroots campaign to protect senior citizens." Recipients who don't answer the survey or donate still are asked to return the form with $6 "to help cover the costs of printing, tabulating and mailing" the surveys.

Since its 2003 formation, the Civic Council has used similar direct-mail campaigns to raise more than $24 million, according to

documents the group is required to file with the Internal Revenue Service. It has reported expenses of more than $27 million.

"Direct mail is expensive and resource-consuming," said Cromwell, who said donations are used to pay for past mailing and printing costs. "You have to have funds to grow the organization."

The council's recent mailings come from the Council of Seniors, one of several programs that the Civic Council operates.

The Civic Council is registered to solicit donations in Kansas and Missouri, according to officials in both states.

The attorneys general in Kansas and Missouri said they had not received complaints about the council or its mailings.

In 2007, Steve Carter, then Indiana's attorney general, called the mailings "devious."

"Our senior population is particularly vulnerable to these types of solicitations because they take their civic duty seriously and might be less likely to question it," Carter said at the time.

Michigan's attorney general issued a similar consumer alert last year, and a North Carolina congresswoman asked that state's attorney general to investigate mailings that sought donations to prevent Social Security money from being sent to Mexico.

Officials with the Better Business Bureau in Kansas City said they had not heard any complaints about the surveys, but a Better Business Bureau office in Idaho last year said the "phony census" was "nothing but a money-making scheme."

Results of the senior surveys are provided to members of Congress and the executive branch, Cromwell said.

In letters to members of Congress, the Council of Seniors claims to have several hundred thousand members.

In a phone interview, Cromwell said that "member" was a "rather loose term" that referred to the number of people who had responded to the council's surveys.

He said the council's goal is to advocate on issues that are important to seniors.

Cromwell and David Richison, who is secretary and treasurer of the Civic Council, are not compensated by the organization, according to the IRS filings.

Both men have other business interests, including ownership stakes in the corporation that operates Period Payroll Services. One of Period Payroll's clients is Stuart Grey, a company that acts as a fundraiser for the Civic Council.

According to its 2008 filing with the IRS, the most recent available, the Civic Council paid Stuart Grey $1.15 million for fundraising services that year.

Kevin Raleigh, the president of Stuart Grey, referred questions to Cromwell. On its Web site, Stuart Grey describes itself as a specialist in connecting nonprofit groups with senior citizens, "America's largest and wealthiest demographic."

Read more here: http://www.kansas.com/2010/02/08/1171407/survey-could-be-mistaken-for-census.html#storylink=cpy

Controversy Thomas Cromwell Nation Branding ScamEdit

Survey could be mistaken for censusEdit

  • By TONY RIZZO
  • Kansas City Star
  • Published Monday, Feb. 8, 2010, at 12:07 a.m.

The U.S. Census Bureau is in the business of counting people.

The Civic Council — a Maryland-based nonprofit that is behind the 2010 Census of Senior Citizens — is not. Instead, it gathers older Americans' opinions and asks for their dollars.

So if recipients mistake the Civic Council's mailings for official U.S. Census documents, the confusion is unintentional, said Thomas Cromwell, the Civic Council's president.

"I never, ever thought about it, frankly," Thomas Cromwell said of possible confusion about the mailings, which have been sent to thousands of seniors across the country, including in the Midwest.

Some officials — including those in the FBI — are concerned.

"It just blared out at me that this is going to confuse anybody who sees it," said Don Reimal, the mayor of Independence, Mo. "It's very misleading."

The FBI office in Kansas City recently issued a public warning about the Census of Senior Citizens mailings, which seek opinions on Social Security, health care, the "death tax," immigration and other issues.

The letters then solicit donations to help "build a strong national grassroots campaign to protect senior citizens." Recipients who don't answer the survey or donate still are asked to return the form with $6 "to help cover the costs of printing, tabulating and mailing" the surveys.

Since its 2003 formation, the Civic Council has used similar direct-mail campaigns to raise more than $24 million, according to

documents the group is required to file with the Internal Revenue Service. It has reported expenses of more than $27 million.

"Direct mail is expensive and resource-consuming," said Cromwell, who said donations are used to pay for past mailing and printing costs. "You have to have funds to grow the organization."

The council's recent mailings come from the Council of Seniors, one of several programs that the Civic Council operates.

The Civic Council is registered to solicit donations in Kansas and Missouri, according to officials in both states.

The attorneys general in Kansas and Missouri said they had not received complaints about the council or its mailings.

In 2007, Steve Carter, then Indiana's attorney general, called the mailings "devious."

"Our senior population is particularly vulnerable to these types of solicitations because they take their civic duty seriously and might be less likely to question it," Carter said at the time.

Michigan's attorney general issued a similar consumer alert last year, and a North Carolina congresswoman asked that state's attorney general to investigate mailings that sought donations to prevent Social Security money from being sent to Mexico.

Officials with the Better Business Bureau in Kansas City said they had not heard any complaints about the surveys, but a Better Business Bureau office in Idaho last year said the "phony census" was "nothing but a money-making scheme."

Results of the senior surveys are provided to members of Congress and the executive branch, Cromwell said.

In letters to members of Congress, the Council of Seniors claims to have several hundred thousand members.

In a phone interview, Cromwell said that "member" was a "rather loose term" that referred to the number of people who had responded to the council's surveys.

He said the council's goal is to advocate on issues that are important to seniors.

Thomas Cromwell and David Richison Period Payroll from Frederick, Md, who is secretary and treasurer of the Civic Council, "are not compensated" by the organization, according to the IRS filings.

Both men have other business interests, including ownership stakes in the corporation that operates Period Payroll Services. One of Period Payroll's clients is Stuart Grey, a company that acts as a fundraiser for the Civic Council.

According to its 2008 filing with the IRS, the most recent available, the Civic Council paid Jonathan Staples Stuart Grey $1.15 million for fundraising services that year.

Kevin Raleigh, the president of Stuart Grey, referred questions to Cromwell. On its Web site, Stuart Grey describes itself as a specialist in connecting nonprofit groups with senior citizens, "America's largest and wealthiest demographic."

Read more here: http://www.kansas.com/2010/02/08/1171407/survey-could-be-mistaken-for-census.html#storylink=cpy


Nation-branding has earned a place as one of the most controversial diplomatic tools in use. Critics argue that it is both deceptive and demeaning to treat the character and identity of a nation as a brand, a commercial product to be manipulated and sold to consumers. Craig Hayden, for instance, has expressed concern not only about the efficacy of branding, but also of its broader political and moral implications:

The problem with branding in the conventional marketing sense is that it hails its audience in a way that does not invite participation in the politics of foreign policy. Public diplomacy is traditionally justified by how foreign publics can shape the foreign policy attitudes of their leadership. Yet if messages are targeted to cultivate brand-loyalty -- does that constitute the kind of dialogue implicit in previous conceptions of public diplomacy?... Or, does branding in fact cheapen the brand itself? Previous criticism of the branding idea argued that it ran against the norms international dialogue, while failing to do justice to the values implicit in the national "brand." I would add a more immediate concern. Branding strategies that rely on proxies begin to conflate the cultural "message" of the Untied States with the contrived brand-image of the corporate proxy. If we invite audiences to view us as brand, we can be just as easily discarded as a consumer product. [6]

In addition, the risk of mishandling campaigns is high, at potentially great cost to the subject nation. Anholt himself acknowledges the danger of the situation, as “public officials without a sophisticated understanding of private sector practice are ‘rather easy victims’ for marketing firms” that often charge exorbitant fees without any real concern for the country’s best interests. Professor Nicolas Papadopoulos of the Sprott School of Business at Carleton University in Ottawa, believes in the potential of nation branding, but points to a number of significant obstacles to making the technique truly effective. Specifically, Papadopoulos notes that the most important challenges currently facing branding are “lack of unity of purpose, difficulty in establishing actionable and measurable objectives, lack of authority over inputs and control over outputs, restricted flexibility, and relative lack of marketing know-how,” and argues that truly effective branding requires a cohesion and expertise that most countries have not yet developed. [7] In defense of the field, branding analysts and scholars argue that most resistance to nation-branding stems from a misunderstanding of the concept. Legitimate branding is not simple product advertising, it is the presentation of a country’s best face to the world to the benefit of its citizens. Anholt is credited with inventing the term “nation branding,” but admits the immediate associations with corporate branding have skewed the real intent of the approach:

I will be the first to admit that I rather regret having coined that phrase. I meant something simple when I first used the phrase nation brand. I meant that nations have images—they always have—and that those images are as important to their progress as the brand images of products are to the corporations that own those products. What I didn’t mean is that you can directly manipulate perceptions. From that point of view, absolutely, nation branding is quite the wrong term. I use it less and less. My latest book is called Competitive Identity. That’s my attempt to replace the phrase nation branding.[8]

From this less commercial perspective, branding may be seen more as a technique for nations to distinguish themselves in the increasingly competitive international system. Such branding is especially important for poorer and developing countries as it allows them to carve out a particular niche in the global marketplace. In a 2007 interview, Anholt defended his field with the following argument:

The old system was that a country could only really succeed in the world if it had conventional military or economic or political power, which meant that 99 percent of countries in the world had lost before they started. If we move toward a marketplace model, which globalization is compelling and which nation branding is a part of, then you have the interesting situation where a small, poor, remote or less-known country, is nonetheless is able to find a niche in the marketplace because of one interesting thing it does that appeals to one sector of the public.[9]

Particular African countries, for instance, could benefit significantly from positive branding to distinguish them from the overarching reputation of the continent as whole. In an article entitled “Brand Africa,” Anholt remarks that “even a relatively prosperous and well-governed nation like Botswana ends up sharing perceptions of violence with Rwanda, of corruption with Nigeria, of poverty with Ethiopia and of famine from Sudan.” [10] In such cases, a positive branding campaign to develop and broadcast a unique, positive national image could be hugely beneficial to the development and international presence of a nation.

Branding Beyond NationsEdit

Thomas CromwellEdit

THOMAS CROMWELL AKA JOHN HARRIES - EAST WEST COMMUNICATIONS @ThCromwellEdit

Expert on international affairs a

Fund-Raisers Use Scare Tactics to Shake Down America's ElderlyEdit

By Joseph S. Enoch

ConsumerAffairs.Com

An organization known as the Civic Council has been tugging at the patriotic emotions of the elderly, mailing aggressive letters requesting donations to keep Social Security out of the hands of illegal aliens. But it's not clear what the money is really used for or even who the Civic Council is. "I saw my husband getting ready to mail a check off somewhere," Arlene Patera of Puyallup, Washington, said. "When I read the letter I knew this had to be a scam." The National Crime Prevention Council recently warned that scams are increasingly directed at senior citizens. advertisement



[4]The letter includes a $1 check and then requests that the individual not cash the check but instead return the check plus $19 to help gather petitions that will, "Help stop Vicente Fox from stealing the money you've worked for all your life." The letter continues for four pages, bashing President Vicente Fox of Mexico while flirting with racist innuendo reminiscent of that earlier “civic council” known as the Ku Klux Klan. Fox, who is part Irish, is a Harvard graduate and was a Coca-Cola executive before being elected president of Mexico in 2000. His term in office ends December 1 and, by law, he is not allowed to succeed himself. "Vicente Fox wants to hand out American Social Security Money to his gangs of Illegal Aliens who've 'come home' to Mexico," the letter states. "Vicente Fox is scheming to take the hard-earned money you've saved in Social Security and give it to Mexicans who laugh in the face of our Immigration Laws." "I'm scared," 67-year-old Patera said. "I want to know how these people got my address." The letter is signed by Carl M. Hagen, executive director. There is no phone number, just a post office box in Frederick, Maryland, for people to mail their donations. However, on the check is another address in Frederick. ConsumerAffairs.Com tracked down the address. It led to Cashbox LLC, a company that receives the mail for the Civic Council and processes the contributions. "The Civic Council is not a scam," said Cashbox CEO Kathleen Clem. Clem said the Civic Council raises money to help pass a bill pending in Congress (H.R. 858, the "Social Security for Americans Only Act of 2005" -- a bill that aims to keep Social Security from going to illegal immigrants who work in the United States and contribute to Social Security when taxes are taken out of their paychecks. Is It True? Older Americans who are counting on Social Security to help them through their old age may be alarmed by the news that illegal immigrants are plotting to loot the Social Security Trust Fund. It sounds scary, but is it true? In a word, no. In fact, the opposite is true: Undocumented workers, those without legitimate Social Security numbers, are paying into the Social Security system with little to no hope of ever drawing any benefits. Since they must use fictitious Social Security numbers, money withheld from their earnings goes into a little-known aspect of the Social Security behemoth known as the Earnings Suspense File (ESF). No one – Mexico’s Fox included -- has proposed giving undocumented workers benefits paid for by others. Instead, HR 858 would keep undocumented workers from getting benefits based on what they themselves have paid into the Social Security system. The ESF is, to be blunt, Social Security's "profit center." It continues to accrue roughly $6 billion a year, with the total as of 2005 sitting at $519 billion. There are those who would say undocumented workers are thus in a position not much different from slavery -- performing work that provides benefits to others but not themselves. Who Are They? So who, exactly, is the Civic Council and what role, if any, does it play in this largely illusory debate? Clem would not share any contact information for the Civic Council, and said she had no idea who Carl Hagen was. She said a Thomas Cromwell was the executive director. Legitimate advocacy organizations like AARP, the National Rifle Association and thousands of others large and small, have well-defined programs that include lobbying, grass-roots organizing and consumer education. Though many are shills for special interests, others vigorously represent their constituencies and are deserving of their members' support. Other than its inflamed fund-raising rhetoric, it's not clear how the Civic Council goes about pursuing its supposed goals. Clem promised she would have either Cromwell or some other representative from the Civic Council call ConsumerAffairs.Com to answer our questions. Weeks went by and we didn't hear anything. We left more than 10 messages, but Clem never responded. During this time ConsumerAffairs.Com also called the number listed on the Civic Council website, but it led to an answering machine. We also visited the Washington, D.C., office listed on the website, but found it occupied instead by a law firm. The organization's website says that Cromwell is the founder and past director of the London Institute in Alexandria, Egypt, the former editor and publisher of "The Middle East Times", and the president of East-West Communications, an "international business consulting firm" that says its primary expertise is in "branding nations to compete globally." "Our primary clients are governments and their embassies in Washington," East West Communications' website says. The company says its services include the production of paid advertising sections in The Washington Post. It claims to have produced special sections for nations including Cote d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Greece, Kazakhstan, Korea, Liberia, Peru and Ukraine. "East West Communications has developed several packages that give governments the best 'bang for their buck' using Post media, including the daily newspaper, the National Weekly Edition, the Sunday Magazine and washingtonpost.com, for a total audience of some nine million. The Post offers significant discounts to embassies and governments," the website claims. What any of this has to do with protecting the retirement savings of older Americans was not entirely clear. Next, ConsumerAffairs.Com examined the latest tax forms for the Civic Council. The filings revealed that in 2004, there were five Civic Council officers, none of whom was identified as “Carl Hagen.” Two of the officers, including Cromwell, drew $30,000 salaries. The nonprofit group had total revenue of $2.7 million, of which all but $8,000 came from contributions. Its expenses include more than $1 million spent on "mailing services" and "caging" -- presumably to Cashbox. There was also $266,832 for "professional fundraising fees" of which there is no further explanation. What Does It Do? Congressmen who introduce bills the Civic Council "supports" claim to have no idea what the group is or what it does. The Civic Council's website, which, according to Archive.org, has hardly changed since December 2003, has an awkward photo of Cromwell standing next to Representative Virgil Goode (Republican-Virginia). "Virgil Goode said he vaguely remembers a man coming up to him a few years ago to pledge his support and ask for a photo," Linwood Duncan, Goode's press secretary, said. "I've talked to staff members who have worked here more than three years and no one has heard of the Civic Council." Republican Representative Ron Paul of Texas, who introduced H.R. 858, was unaware of the Civic Council as well, said Paul spokesman Jeff Deist. "I asked a number of people in the office and no one's heard of the Civic Council," Deist said. Deist said the bill is a long way from passage: "It currently is standing in front of the Social Security Subcommittee," he said. "It's tough sledding from here." Deist said consumers should not mail money to get a bill passed. "Groups can use any bill to try and get donations," Deist said. "There are a lot of groups out there trying to profit on senior issues . . . . If this bill is important to someone, they should contact their local (Congressional) representative and ask them to cosponsor it." Other organizations that deal with issues affecting seniors professed ignorance of the Civic Council and the Council of Seniors. "We don't know anything about them," said Scott Parkin of the National Council on Aging. "As far as I know they're not a member of any (aging) leadership council organizations." After questions about the Civic Council went unanswered, ConsumerAffairs.Com traveled back to the Cashbox offices. This time Clem did not defend the actions of the Civic Council. "I don't know what they do," she kept repeating. "All I do is open their mail." Consumers who wish to have their names taken off the Civic Council's mailing list should call Cashbox at 301-631-1010 or write to 550 Highland Street, Suite 403, Frederick, Maryland 21701. (Article courtesy of ConsumerAffairs.com)

Domain ID:D169245280-LROR Domain Name:DIPLOMACYFELLOWSHIP.ORG Created On:19-Jul-2013 21:00:56 UTC Expiration Date:19-Jul-2014 21:00:56 UTC Sponsoring Registrar:1 & 1 Internet AG (R73-LROR) Status:TRANSFER PROHIBITED Registrant ID:SPAG-36712902 Registrant Name:Thomas Cromwell Registrant Organization:Wheathill LLC Registrant Street1:132 Emmitsburg Rd Registrant Street2: Registrant Street3: Registrant City:Thurmont Registrant State/Province:MD Registrant Postal Code:21788 Registrant Country:US Registrant Phone:+1.3012713756 Registrant Phone Ext.: Registrant FAX:+1.3012719265 Registrant FAX Ext.: Registrant Email:thcromwell@aol.com Admin ID:SPAG-36712902 Admin Name:Thomas Cromwell Admin Organization:Wheathill LLC Admin Street1:132 Emmitsburg Rd Admin Street2: Admin Street3: Admin City:Thurmont Admin State/Province:MD Admin Postal Code:21788 Admin Country:US Admin Phone:+1.3012713756 Admin Phone Ext.: Admin FAX:+1.3012719265 Admin FAX Ext.: Admin Email:thcromwell@aol.com Tech ID:SPAG-32126886 Tech Name:Hostmaster ONEANDONE Tech Organization:1&1 Internet Inc. Tech Street1:701 Lee Rd. Tech Street2:Suite 300 Tech Street3: Tech City:Chesterbrook Tech State/Province:PA Tech Postal Code:19087 Tech Country:US Tech Phone:+1.8774612631 Tech Phone Ext.: Tech FAX:+1.6105601501 Tech FAX Ext.: Tech Email:hostmaster@1and1.com Name Server:NS-US.1AND1-DNS.COM Name Server:NS-US.1AND1-DNS.US Name Server:NS-US.1AND1-DNS.ORG Name Server:NS-US.1AND1-DNS.DE

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  In addition to country campaigns, branding can be equally effective on virtually any scale in the international realm. “Place branding” and “city branding” offer more narrowly targeted campaigns, and are clearly apparent in the international reputation of cities such as London, New York, and Beijing, all of which immediately conjure particular associations and images. Place branding should also be distinguished from nation branding because it frequently involves multiple stakeholders, often with competing interests. As Randall Frost, author of The Globalization of Trade remarks, “Trying to market a country to tourists as a mountain hideaway inhabited by rustic peasants may not serve the interests of those wishing to promote the country’s budding industrial infrastructure to foreign investors”[11]. Branding can also be applied on a larger scale, as in the case of international organizations such as the United Nations and the European Union, which have definite, practical interests in presenting a positive international image. The European Union, for example, has been working to solidify its reputation as a united and accessible representative of Europe. The Commission has focused on increasing its media presence, including the “EU Tube” video service launched in June of 2007.(see EU Tube) The goal, as stated by Margot Wallström, Vice-President for Institutional Relations and Communication Strategy, is to “[reflect] the Commission’s commitment to better explain its policies and actions on issues which concern citizens across the EU.” [12]In addition, the Commission hosts a range of cultural events intended to boost the image and popularity of a united Europe, including “Europe days,” film festivals, concerts, and fairs. See European Commission Policies and Initiatives.

Branding Campaigns Past and PresentEdit

[West Communications - Nation Branding] United Kingdom: “Cool Britannia”Edit

THOMAS CROMWELL  East West Communications - Civic Council Senior Center President

  • Fund-Raisers Use Scare Tactics to Shake Down America's Elderly

By Joseph S. Enoch ConsumerAffairs.Com

An organization known as the Civic Council has been tugging at the patriotic emotions of the elderly, mailing aggressive letters requesting donations to keep Social Security out of the hands of illegal aliens. But it's not clear what the money is really used for or even who the Civic Council is.

"I saw my husband getting ready to mail a check off somewhere," Arlene Patera of Puyallup, Washington, said. "When I read the letter I knew this had to be a scam." The National Crime Prevention Council recently warned that scams are increasingly directed at senior citizens. The letter includes a $1 check and then requests that the individual not cash the check but instead return the check plus $19 to help gather petitions that will, "Help stop Vicente Fox from stealing the money you've worked for all your life."

The letter continues for four pages, bashing President Vicente Fox of Mexico while flirting with racist innuendo reminiscent of that earlier “civic council” known as the Ku Klux Klan. Fox, who is part Irish, is a Harvard graduate and was a Coca-Cola executive before being elected president of Mexico in 2000. His term in office ends December 1 and, by law, he is not allowed to succeed himself.

"Vicente Fox wants to hand out American Social Security Money to his gangs of Illegal Aliens who've 'come home' to Mexico," the letter states. "Vicente Fox is scheming to take the hard-earned money you've saved in Social Security and give it to Mexicans who laugh in the face of our Immigration Laws."

"I'm scared," 67-year-old Patera said. "I want to know how these people got my address."

The letter is signed by Carl M. Hagen, executive director. There is no phone number, just a post office box in Frederick, Maryland, for people to mail their donations. However, on the check is another address in Frederick. ConsumerAffairs.Com tracked down the address. It led to Cashbox LLC, a company that receives the mail for the Civic Council and processes the contributions.

"The Civic Council is not a scam," said Cashbox CEO Kathleen Clem. Clem said the Civic Council raises money to help pass a bill pending in Congress (H.R. 858, the "Social Security for Americans Only Act of 2005" -- a bill that aims to keep Social Security from going to illegal immigrants who work in the United States and contribute to Social Security when taxes are taken out of their paychecks.

Is It True? Older Americans who are counting on Social Security to help them through their old age may be alarmed by the news that illegal immigrants are plotting to loot the Social Security Trust Fund. It sounds scary, but is it true?

In a word, no. In fact, the opposite is true: Undocumented workers, those without legitimate Social Security numbers, are paying into the Social Security system with little to no hope of ever drawing any benefits. Since they must use fictitious Social Security numbers, money withheld from their earnings goes into a little-known aspect of the Social Security behemoth known as the Earnings Suspense File (ESF).

No one – Mexico’s Fox included -- has proposed giving undocumented workers benefits paid for by others. Instead, HR 858 would keep undocumented workers from getting benefits based on what they themselves have paid into the Social Security system.

The ESF is, to be blunt, Social Security's "profit center." It continues to accrue roughly $6 billion a year, with the total as of 2005 sitting at $519 billion. There are those who would say undocumented workers are thus in a position not much different from slavery -- performing work that provides benefits to others but not themselves.

Who Are They? So who, exactly, is the Civic Council and what role, if any, does it play in this largely illusory debate? Clem would not share any contact information for the Civic Council, and said she had no idea who Carl Hagen was. She said a Thomas Cromwell aka John Harries real name resident of 132 Emmitsburg Rd. Thurmont Md born in UK was the executive director.

Legitimate advocacy organizations like AARP, the National Rifle Association and thousands of others large and small, have well-defined programs that include lobbying, grass-roots organizing and consumer education. Though many are shills for special interests, others vigorously represent their constituencies and are deserving of their members' support.

Other than its inflamed fund-raising rhetoric, it's not clear how the Civic Council goes about pursuing its supposed goals.

Clem promised she would have either Cromwell or some other representative from the Civic Council call ConsumerAffairs.Com to answer our questions. Weeks went by and we didn't hear anything. We left more than 10 messages, but Clem never responded. During this time ConsumerAffairs.Com also called the number listed on the Civic Council website, but it led to an answering machine. We also visited the Washington, D.C., office listed on the website, but found it occupied instead by a law firm.

The organization's website says that Cromwell is the founder and past director of the London Institute in Alexandria, Egypt, the former editor and publisher of "The Middle East Times", and the president of East-West Communications, an "international business consulting firm" that says its primary expertise is in "branding nations to compete globally."

"Our primary clients are governments and their embassies in Washington," East West Communications' website says. The company says its services include the production of paid advertising sections in The Washington Post. It claims to have produced special sections for nations including Cote d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Greece, Kazakhstan, Korea, Liberia, Peru and Ukraine.

"East West Communications from Washington, DC has developed several packages that give governments the best 'bang for their buck' using Post media, including the daily newspaper, the National Weekly Edition, the Sunday Magazine andwashingtonpost.com, for a total audience of some nine million. The Post offers significant discounts to embassies and governments," the website claims.

What any of this has to do with protecting the retirement savings of older Americans was not entirely clear.

Next, ConsumerAffairs.Com examined the latest tax forms for the Civic Council.

The filings revealed that in 2004, there were five Civic Council officers, none of whom was identified as “Carl Hagen.” Two of the officers, including Cromwell, drew $30,000 salaries. The nonprofit group had total revenue of $2.7 million, of which all but $8,000 came from contributions. Its expenses include more than $1 million spent on "mailing services" and "caging" -- presumably to Cashbox. There was also $266,832 for "professional fundraising fees" of which there is no further explanation.

What Does It Do? Congressmen who introduce bills the Civic Council "supports" claim to have no idea what the group is or what it does.

The Civic Council's website, which, according to Archive.org, has hardly changed since December 2003, has an awkward photo of Cromwell standing next to Representative Virgil Goode (Republican-Virginia).

"Virgil Goode said he vaguely remembers a man coming up to him a few years ago to pledge his support and ask for a photo," Linwood Duncan, Goode's press secretary, said. "I've talked to staff members who have worked here more than three years and no one has heard of the Civic Council."

Republican Representative Ron Paul of Texas, who introduced H.R. 858, was unaware of the Civic Council as well, said Paul spokesman Jeff Deist. "I asked a number of people in the office and no one's heard of the Civic Council," Deist said.

Deist said the bill is a long way from passage: "It currently is standing in front of the Social Security Subcommittee," he said. "It's tough sledding from here."

Deist said consumers should not mail money to get a bill passed. "Groups can use any bill to try and get donations," Deist said. "There are a lot of groups out there trying to profit on senior issues . . . . If this bill is important to someone, they should contact their local (Congressional) representative and ask them to cosponsor it."

Other organizations that deal with issues affecting seniors professed ignorance of the Civic Council and the Council of Seniors.

"We don't know anything about them," said Scott Parkin of the National Council on Aging. "As far as I know they're not a member of any (aging) leadership council organizations."

After questions about the Civic Council went unanswered, ConsumerAffairs.Com traveled back to the Cashbox offices. This time Clem did not defend the actions of the Civic Council.

"I don't know what they do," she kept repeating. "All I do is open their mail."

Consumers who wish to have their names taken off the Civic Council's mailing list should call Cashbox at 301-631-1010 or write to 550 Highland Street, Suite 403, Frederick, Maryland 21701.

(Article courtesy of ConsumerAffairs.com)

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KANSAS CITY, Missouri -- The U.S. Census Bureau is in the business of counting people.

The Civic Council -- a Maryland-based nonprofit that is behind the 2010 Census of Senior Citizens -- is not. Instead, it gathers older Americans' opinions and asks for their dollars.

So if recipients mistake the Civic Council's mailings for official U.S. census documents, the confusion is unintentional, said Thomas Cromwell, the Civic Council's president.

"I never, ever thought about it, frankly," Cromwell said of possible confusion about the mailings, which have been sent to thousands of seniors across the country.

Some officials -- including those in the FBI -- are concerned.

"It just blared out at me that this is going to confuse anybody who sees it," said Don Reimal, the mayor of Independence, Mo. "It's very misleading."

More about the census

More about the FBI

More on government

More business news: Cleveland.com/business

More national news: Cleveland.com/nation

Reimal said he worries that people who fill out the Civic Council's survey won't respond to legitimate Census Bureau mailings when they arrive this spring.

The FBI office in Kansas City recently issued a public warning about the Census of Senior Citizens mailings, which seek opinions on Social Security, health care, the "death tax," immigration and other issues.

The letters then solicit donations to help "build a strong national grassroots campaign to protect senior citizens." Recipients who don't answer the survey or donate still are asked to return the form with $6 "to help cover the costs of printing, tabulating and mailing" the surveys.

Since its 2003 formation, the Civic Council has used similar direct-mail campaigns to raise more than $24 million, according to documents the group is required to file with the Internal Revenue Service. It has reported expenses of more than $27 million.

"Direct mail is expensive and resource-consuming," said Cromwell, who said donations are used to pay for past mailing and printing costs. "You have to have funds to grow the organization."

The council's recent mailings come from the Council of Seniors, one of several programs that the Civic Council operates.

Thomas Cromwell and David Richison, who is secretary and treasurer of the Civic Council from Frederick Md. are not compensated by the organization, according to the IRS filings.

Both men have other business interests, including ownership stakes in the corporation that operates Period Payroll Services in Frederick, Md. One of Period Payroll's clients is Jonathan and Hilda Staples (partners also of Civic Council Senior Center, Volt Restaurant, Family Meal Restaurant, Range Restaurant in Frederick, Md) Stuart Grey, a company that acts as a fundraiser for the Civic Council from Frederick, Md.

According to its 2008 filing with the IRS, the most recent available, the Civic Council from Frederick, Md paid Jonathan and Hilda Staples Stuart Grey $1,151,543 for fundraising services that year.

Kevin Raleigh, the president of Stuart Grey, referred questions to Cromwell. On its Web site, Stuart Grey describes itself as a specialist in connecting nonprofit groups with senior citizens, "America's largest and wealthiest demographic."

The Civic Council is registered to solicit donations in Kansas and Missouri, according to officials in both states.

The attorneys general in Kansas and Missouri said they had not received complaints about the council or its mailings, but attorneys general in other states have.

In 2007, Steve Carter, then Indiana's attorney general, called the mailings "devious."

"Our senior population is particularly vulnerable to these types of solicitations because they take their civic duty seriously and might be less likely to question it," Carter said at the time.

Michigan's attorney general issued a similar consumer alert last year, and a North Carolina congresswoman asked that state's attorney general to investigate mailings that sought donations to prevent Social Security money from being sent to Mexico.

Officials with the Better Business Bureau in Kansas City said they had not heard any complaints about the surveys, but a Better Business Bureau office in Idaho last year said the "phony census" was "nothing but a money-making scheme."

Results of the senior surveys are provided to members of Congress and the executive branch, Thomas Cromwell said.

In letters to members of Congress, the Council of Seniors claims to have several hundred thousand members.

In a phone interview, Thomas Cromwell from East West Communications Washington, DC said that "member" was a "rather loose term" that referred to the number of people who had responded to the council's surveys.

He said the council's goal is to advocate on issues that are important to seniors.

http://www.cleveland.com/natio...

(c) 2010, The Kansas City Star.

Switzerland: “Presence Switzerland”Edit

Switzerland is considered to have one the strongest national brands, due in large part to “Presence Switzerland” (PRS). Initiated in 2000, PRS’s function is to “highlight Switzerland's particular values, qualities and characteristics” in such a way as to raise the nation’s international profile in a positive and attractive manner. Switzerland is already associated with strong, attractive clichés, including beautiful landscapes, fine chocolate and watches, as well as organizations such as the Red Cross. Building on this positive foundation, PRS’s approach is to highlight specific offerings as representative of various aspects of the national character, which ultimately come together to create a broadly positive image of Switzerland that appeals to both policy-makers and citizens abroad. PRS explains their strategy of associating particular images with broader national qualities: For example, we take transport timetables as an illustration of the key element efficiency, biological agriculture as a demonstration of sustainability, the Swiss financial centre for the elements trustworthy and stability, the PAC car II (developed by the Federal Institute of Technology Zurich) for curious and Science City for reconciling differences. [13] Presence Switzerland’s campaigns have proven highly effective, with the nation continuing to enjoy one of the most positive international reputations in the world

MalaysiaEdit

Malaysia is currently in the early stages of developing a Malaysian master brand, intended to help the country solidify a positive reputation and further its progress towards development. Malaysian Development Institute (MDI) director Prof Datuk Dr Noor Azlan Ghazali said a strong brand would convey to global and domestic investors where the country is heading, and will focus on creating a common image consistent across political, economic, and social sectors. Specifically, as globalization has intensified global competition, the Malaysian brand will attempt to shift its focus from agriculture towards manufacturing and services, utilizing assets such as its economic and political stability as a legitimizing force for the brand. Dr Noor Azlan summarized the initiative by emphasizing the need for cohesion: We want to ensure all layers of society - citizens as well as investors - move in line with the shift. We have moved from the low income to an upper middle-income economy, and we want to continue advancing to become a developed nation by 2020. We want everyone to get aboard the speeding train. [14]

South KoreaEdit

See South Korea.

==Nation Branding Thomas Cromwell aka John Harries ( Unification Church ) East West Communications DC Unofficial 'Census of Senior Citizens' by a money-seeking nonprofit gets attention of FBI


The FBI office in Kansas City recently issued a public warning about the Census of Senior Citizens mailings, which seek opinions on Social Security, health care, the "death tax," immigration and other issues.

The letters then solicit donations to help "build a strong national grassroots campaign to protect senior citizens." Recipients who don't answer the survey or donate still are asked to return the form with $6 "to help cover the costs of printing, tabulating and mailing" the surveys.

Since its 2003 formation, the Civic Council has used similar direct-mail campaigns to raise more than $24 million, according to documents the group is required to file with the Internal Revenue Service. It has reported expenses of more than $27 million.

"Direct mail is expensive and resource-consuming," said Cromwell, who said donations are used to pay for past mailing and printing costs. "You have to have funds to grow the organization."

The council's recent mailings come from the Council of Seniors, one of several programs that the Civic Council operates.

Thomas Cromwell aka John Harries from UK and David Richison, (Period Payroll Services, Frederick, Md ) who is secretary and treasurer of the Civic Council, are not compensated by the organization, according to the IRS filings.

Both men have other business interests, including ownership stakes in the corporation that operates Period Payroll Services. One of Period Payroll's clients is Stuart Grey, a company that acts as a fundraiser for the Civic Council.

According to its 2008 filing with the IRS, the most recent available, the Civic Council paid Stuart Grey $1,151,543 for fundraising services that year.

Kevin Raleigh, the president of Stuart Grey, referred questions to Cromwell. On its Web site, Stuart Grey describes itself as a specialist in connecting nonprofit groups with senior citizens, "America's largest and wealthiest demographic."

The Civic Council is registered to solicit donations in Kansas and Missouri, according to officials in both states.

The attorneys general in Kansas and Missouri said they had not received complaints about the council or its mailings, but attorneys general in other states have.

In 2007, Steve Carter, then Indiana's attorney general, called the mailings "devious."

"Our senior population is particularly vulnerable to these types of solicitations because they take their civic duty seriously and might be less likely to question it," Carter said at the time.

Michigan's attorney general issued a similar consumer alert last year, and a North Carolina congresswoman asked that state's attorney general to investigate mailings that sought donations to prevent Social Security money from being sent to Mexico.

Officials with the Better Business Bureau in Kansas City said they had not heard any complaints about the surveys, but a Better Business Bureau office in Idaho last year said the "phony census" was "nothing but a money-making scheme."

Results of the senior surveys are provided to members of Congress and the executive branch, Cromwell said.

In letters to members of Congress, the Council of Seniors claims to have several hundred thousand members.

In a phone interview, Cromwell said that "member" was a "rather loose term" that referred to the number of people who had responded to the council's surveys.

He said the council's goal is to advocate on issues that are important to seniors.

http://www.cleveland.com/nation/index.ssf/2010/02/unofficial_census_of_senior_ci.html


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